Who's Into Saltwater?

Tony

Staff member
Here is an interesting before/after. The first image is without any filter on my camera (phone) and the second is with a filter. So much more color in the second. And compared to the video, this will show a little more detail for a full tank shot.

Without Filter
20220730_205322.jpg

With Filter
20220730_205318.jpg
 

Tony

Staff member
Did some checking last night and I found something bad that I didn't even know I had in the tank. On the right side of the tank you can see a single head of Torch which has been there for years and has never spread and shortly after I got it, never opened. Well last night, I pulled out the camera so I could zoom in, and there it was, euphyllia eating flatworms. I then started looking closer and they are all over the tank. Little buggers are hard to see which is why I never noticed them. I have a couple options and not sure which way I'm going to go yet.

Screenshot_20220801-030256_Gallery.jpg
 

D.O.G.

Goblin 380 Supporter
Well that sucks and I imagine one of your options is to drain the tank and I bet your not happy about that.
 

Tony

Staff member
There are two ways to combat these little turds. The first is to pull each coral frag out and dip them into a solution to kill the worms. However, this is not a good solution as I have over 100 heads of hammer alone in this tank, and the worms are all over the rock as well. So it would not get rid of them.

The second option is to actually treat the tank. However this has some pretty severe risks as when you kill these worms, as they are dying, they release a toxin into the water column that can kill everything in the tank. It's basically ammonia but still a toxin. So if I dose the tank, it will have to be done 3-4 times about every 3-4 days. Each time you dose the tank, you will have to do a 50% water change and you will have to run a butt load of carbon to remove the toxin from the water. So in less than 2 weeks, that is 200 gallons of water that needs to be changed and about $80 worth of carbon.

There is a third option, but that one is still being kept under wraps while we iron out the details. I'm sure you all will like it though. If we are able to do it.
 

Tony

Staff member
None of the ways will be cheap, and definitely not easy. Just one of the downsides to a reef tank. However, this could be a great learning opportunity for others. I will be doing a video on this when it comes time to actually act on removing them. Kind of looking forward to it as a torch can be amazing in the tank fully extended.
 

D.O.G.

Goblin 380 Supporter
None of the ways will be cheap, and definitely not easy. Just one of the downsides to a reef tank.
You're so right. I have seen my friend, and once roommate actually cry. Diving was his hobby and every time he got back from the Keys, he always brought back some kind of beautiful fish that cost big $$$$ to put in his tank. I came home from work one evening to a grown man crying and a 100-gallon tank full of dead exotic fish that he caught over the years. Long story short, I turned around and got :cussing:out of there, and disappear for the evening.
 

Tony

Staff member
The wife and I are planning out a dedicated fish and dedicated coral quarantine tank. I want both to be up and running at all times. Coral tank will require high powered lights, however the fish only tank only needs some light, which is easy to do. It's time to start doing the responsible thing, even if our electricity bill goes up by 25% lol. Love the hobby too much. And definitely don't want to toss 10 years down the drain.
 

Tony

Staff member
Been doing the usual with the tank, nothing really happening at this time. did a water change yesterday, checked the alkalinity and added the required amount and also pulled out my torch coral and did a fresh water dip on it. I just wanted to do a temporary test to see if it would respond, and it did, kind of. This was one large head which has split into two small heads. You can see this in the video below when I zoom out. That large base used to be the coral, now it's those two little heads.

As stated previously, the tank has flatworms in it and they absolutely love the torch. The head on the left is doing okay, the one on the right, I suspect has some small flatworms on it causing it to not open. We are currently weighing our options on what we are going to do. Either start completely over, or try to remove the fish and nuke the tank with some Flatworm Exit. You can leave the fish in the tank, but no need to put them through that kind of stress. I'm sure there are thousands of these worms, so the water quality is going to drop significantly until I do the 48 hour water change.

 
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