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Servos Servo Power Box

Discussion in 'Electronics' started by Derek, Oct 12, 2017.

  1. Derek

    Derek RC Help Supporter

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    Hey all! Ive recently heard about a servo power box that will supply constant and consistent power to the servos on a plane. My LHS was less than helpful (not surprised) and im having troubles locating one online. Would you be able to point me in the right direction? I have an 84" wingspan "high wing" plane built and id just like to make sure that im getting ample power to all of the 10kg metal gear servos.
     


  2. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

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    Since I didn't fly large scale models... I only know about them in general.

    While some of the ones I've heard about have some power regulation to keep a consistent output ... it's more about power redundancy and not just for the servos but also for the ignition on the models that require that ( such as gas engine aircraft ). On models without ignitions, many just use two battery packs and connect them to the receiver on separate ports with each having their own switch. The "boxes" do about the same but often have a single kill switch incorporated so you don't have to turn off two switches and if one battery pack shorts out, they will keep it from affecting the power from the other battery ( which would drain the secondary pack ). If using the two pack method, just make certain both battery packs are of the same type and size.

    Do a search for "rc power redundant box" or similar... you should get several results and can watch some vids or read up on the general concept.
     
  3. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

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    Dang it... I can't edit this one... ( thought you fixed my permissions Tony )....

    I'm going to reword that... hopefully so it's not as confusing and explains it a little more.


    While many of the "boxes" can or do regulate the power... that isn't what these are about or for. They are so the aircraft has redundant power supplies for the receiver/servo's and/or the ignition circuit if the aircraft has one in case of a short or open circuit in one of the battery packs. On all electric craft, there can also be dual redundancy for the motors but since most large scale craft run with gas engines... it's probably not as common.

    So what you are really looking for is a power redundant circuit.... not a power regulator for just the servo's ( to keep the voltage consistent ). If all you are powering is the receiver and servos... many just plug two receiver packs and switches directly into the receiver and call it good. The circuits only add additional safety when one battery pack shorts out so it can't drain the secondary pack. Some of them also provide a little bit of power regulation so they are pulling power from the pack with the most charge left on it... but again, that's a secondary function and isn't as important.

    If you are also flying a gas engine that requires an ignition circuit.... then you'll want that to also have redundancy so you don't have to land dead stick.

    There are two primary types of rc power redundant circuits then ( that I'm aware of besides the electric motor one I mentioned ).... one for powering just the receiver/servos and then one that also can power the ignition circuit.

    A search ( Google or other ) for "rc power redundant" or "rc power redundancy" should get you the information you are looking for as far as available products and probably some vids as well.
     
  4. Admiral

    Admiral I Support Rc-Help! Rc-Help Supporter

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    Hi Derek it sounds like an external BEC to me, the only one I can find that is referred to as a power box is this one which allows two servos to be powered on each channel.

    Mini Power DP Ubec 2103
     
  5. murankar

    murankar Moderator Staff Member

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  6. Admiral

    Admiral I Support Rc-Help! Rc-Help Supporter

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    That would seem more like something that could be described as a "Server power box" that what I suggested.
     
  7. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

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  8. Derek

    Derek RC Help Supporter

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    Thanks very much for your time, guys! I am running an OPTO esc with a 6.6v LiFe rx pack. Thats probably as good as i need. I was just wondering if there was a better way to go.

    Thanks again! Now i just need some non-raining weather to maiden this thing.
     
  9. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

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    The article I linked to... is a top end unit. I'm pretty sure you can get something that'd be 1/3rd of the cost and give you a little redundancy and protection against a shorted pack.
     
  10. Grumpy

    Grumpy New Member

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    You might want to use that 6.6 volt LIFE battery as a control (receiver) battery using a voltage regulator that would supply 5 volts to the receiver which then supplies the same voltage to the servos and opto esc. Hook your heavier flight battery to the input of the opto esc and the output to your motor. You can get the regulator usually in 3 or 5 amp output at a consistant voltage of 5 volts. There is plenty of information available on multiple RC websites on how to set this up.
    This setup allows you to have your control responses even if you loose your motor battery or have motor problems in flight.
    Don't forget that the majority of servos have a 6 volt limit unless you are using high voltage servos.
     
    Derek likes this.

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