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Cameras Resolution and image question

D.O.G.

Well-Known Member
Goblin 380 Supporter
I'm trying to figure out if which works the best ?
  • Horizontal Resolution - 1000TVL
  • Image Sensor - 1/2.8" Starlight CMOS Sensor OR
  • Horizontal resolution: 800TVL
  • Image sensor: 1/1.8 inch CMOS sensor These are 2 FPV cameras I'm looking at. Just not sure if I understand correctly that higher resolution supposable to be better ?
 

RandyDSok

Well-Known Member
The 1000TVL and 800TVL refers to how many horizontal lines on screen. So the 1000TVL is better / higher.

The larger 1/2.8" is going to be a better sized sensor so as long as it's also a quality sensor ( as I think it may be ), likely the better of the two. "Starlight" is the name that Sony gave a line of sensors they make ( if this isn't a chinese copy/clone ) that are good at low light viewing.

I'd like a model name of the camera that mentioned having a Starlight sensor or a link if possible...
 

RandyDSok

Well-Known Member
Thanks D.O.G.

I watched the vid on that page... I don't think that specific cam would work in the scenario I was thinking of as a night time color camera not using lighting, too much noise in the shot. Currently I've got a cheap PTZ camera but it requires the IR led lights for any decent night shots ( in B/W ) and you can't use those from inside of a window. I don't need the PTZ portion to capture video out my front window ... but I'd hoped that sensor being a Starlight one, would have been less noisy. Of course by the time I added some electronics to connect my computer to it, it'd probably cost almost as much as what I've found already that is made for that job.
 

D.O.G.

Well-Known Member
Goblin 380 Supporter
Thanks RDS. Beside the noise factor, will this camera be worse the $$$$ to spend or keep looking? I'm in no rush :).
 

RandyDSok

Well-Known Member
Thanks RDS. Beside the noise factor, will this camera be worse the $$$$ to spend or keep looking? I'm in no rush :).

I don't know, I'm not even sure what to look for in an FPV camera... I'd suggest watching each products video in full screen mode ( preferably on a monitor and not a cell phone or other small screen ).

I will say that on the video they had on the page, they compared it with a Phoenix 2 and I liked the video of that camera more than the other one... having said that, I was looking at the noise levels and not if there was any "jello" effects or other bad stuff.
 

RandyDSok

Well-Known Member
Ok... I've been trying to read up a little on these FPV cameras and gear in order to consider using them for a security camera that has good low light images without the need for additional IR LED's ... and found some of what I mentioned here already may not apply completely or something like that. Because of the following info, I'm scraping the idea to use one of these cameras for a security camera even though I'm impressed with some of the low light capabilities some of these have. I still want higher actual resolutions as well and these analog FPV cameras don't provide that.

In the USA, we standardize on using NTSC video encoding ( PAL in other areas around the globe ). The resolution and frame rate for NTSC is 720x480 @30fps ...

The TVL's ( TV lines ) is another aspect that describes how many black and white TV lines are in a single frame. For example, a 600TVL camera will have 300 black and 300 white alternating lines of resolution, so a 1200TVL camera will double that. However due to the limitations of the 5.8Ghz video transmissions that doesn't always mean a higher quality video image due to those limitations. Your other equipment, ie the transmitter, receiver and the monitor ( or goggles ) you are using also come into play. In short, a 1200TVL camera will not be twice as sharp as a 600TVL because of the additional limitations.

So don't judge your purchase on that number ( TVL ) base it on the actual image quality you see. In other words, as I suggested before, watch the video reviews and look at what image appears best to you... don't base it on specs alone.
 

D.O.G.

Well-Known Member
Goblin 380 Supporter
Thanks Randy. I get very good information from you then I would get from your ordinary Joe-Shmoo on the street or you-tube lol.
 

D.O.G.

Well-Known Member
Goblin 380 Supporter

RandyDSok

Well-Known Member
Thanks for that info...

Some of the features I'm looking for are...

PTZ ... ie pan tilt zoom. So not looking for a fixed position. Something I can look left and right with for the most part so I can try and see what made whatever sound I just heard. The zoom part, isn't going to be big on my list but I'd mention if you wanted it... you want optical zoom and not digital which is what most camera's support. Decent optical zooms are expensive, so outside of my limited budget.

NO IR LED's to assist in the night vision. I don't own the home I'm in so no running power cables to something outside, this will be mounted inside and you can't use IR LED's to light up outside of a windows... it just reflects back into the lens and you see nothing. This is where the Sony Starlight sensors really work well... and also they can do it in color in many lighting conditions at night. For instance that Runcam swift 2 even is decent at night with a 0.01 lux sensor.... the Sony Starlight sensors are even more sensitive at around 0.0001 Lux ... Some of those FPV cameras actually has that sensor in them but as I mentioned, they are NTSC which is a lower resolution than what I'm looking for... I probably will want at least a 1080p resolution.

I've seen some that fit my wants... but they are around $200 and sometimes a little less when on special. Their prices have come down since I first started looking. This is sort of why I was a little excited at seeing those FPV cams that have the good Sony sensors in them. Until of course I ran into the resolution issues I mentioned. I was even thinking of getting a crappy PTZ camera for the PT portion of it... southern engineer in one of those FPV cams and an additional transmitter with power ( if I couldn't jump power off of the included PS on the PTZ ). So doing some pessimistic math.... the PTZ cam for around $25-30, the FPV cam around $40, a transmitter at $40, a receiver with USB output at $40... so maybe around $150-ish if I couldn't find a quality part somewhere at a better price.

Oh well... it was fun thinking about it while it lasted. I'll just keep looking for a deal and perhaps one will come along before long. Oh... Almost forgot another feature that it must have... a high dynamic range. It needs to be able to show say a neighbor's porch light without blowing out the shot while also showing details in the dark areas that are not lit up very well. I believe the Sony sensors I've read about also support HDR as well, so I'm at least on the right track.
 

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