1. If you would like to get rid of these banners and the ads within the posts, all you have to do is sign up and they will go away!
  2. Welcome to Rc-Help, are you here looking for the PDF Plans? They are located in the store in the tab above, but you must be signed in to access that part of the site. It only takes a second to sign up!
  3. Like Us On Facebook!
    Hello Guest, it occurred to us during that last server failure that we had no way of informing the members of the site of the failure and I would like to invite you to like us on facebook so that you can get updates if the site happens to go down again. We don't post much over there unless we are updating the members so we will not flood your feed like some places do. Just click on Like and then allow notifications and that's it. See you there soon!

    Click Here To Rc-Help's Facebook page!
    Dismiss Notice
Hey Guest, I see you are not signed up on our forum yet. Did you know Registration is FREE and is only a couple clicks away? You can even sign in from Facebook, Twitter or Google+ for your convenience! So what are you waiting for, CLICK HERE to join in on the conversation!

Misc. Wingtip Strobes

Discussion in 'Electronics' started by grumpy1, Oct 9, 2018.

  1. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    I have 6Hz wing tip strobes on one of my planes. The question is the flash or blink rate is fine, but to give it a more scale look would like to have it blink..blink..blink...pause..blink..
    Blink...blink...can that be achieved with some kind of inline capacitor. If so how?
     


  2. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Norman, Ok USA
    You're going to need something more complex than just a capacitor.

    First a correction to what you wrote. Capacitors are not used inline, they are connected to a power source and a ground. When power is applied to them, they begin to store the voltage and "charge" up, when the power source is disconnected they release the voltage they've stored back to the circuit load. To say it another way, they buffer ( store ) the voltage until they are full and release it once the power source is stopped.

    What you need is a timer circuit. I suspect a simple one using a 555 timer chip setup in astable mode would do what you are asking but it will take a bit of calculating to find out specifically what components you'd need. You'd need a couple of capacitors and a couple of resistors ( or better yet, two potentiometers so you can vary the time off and time on portions )... The values for the components you'll need will depend on the voltages and amperage of your circuit that is driving your strobes. If the circuit you are driving ( ie the strobes ) has a high amperage draw, you will likely need a relay also in order to switch things on/off so you don't overload the timer chip.

    Here is an Instructable on using the 555 timer chip in 3 different modes ( including the astable mode )

    555 Timer


    Here is a video describing the basics of the 555 timer in it's various modes...

     
  3. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    Well...remember you ain't talkin to Nicola Telsa...in just a crusty ol' grumpy retired union pipe fitter..I had kinda hard time on something so simple as dot nav lights...resistors...voltage drop...mah..I'm process piping guy if I understood the terminology of the various components...would help greatly. I'm as lost as last years Easter egg:duh:
     
  4. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Norman, Ok USA
    Sorry it was a little ruff for ya... but it's a technical issue and required a technical answer if you had a chance of getting something you wanted. As far as electrical circuits go, it's a rather simple one but it does require a little understanding of the subject like many things.
     
  5. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    Well, I ain't gonna give up...just have to do the 3 R's...Research...Read...Respond I know I got enough gray matter to try..I think I do anyway, look out YouTube I'm on the way. Hate for something like that to kick my butt
     
  6. murankar

    murankar Moderator Staff Member Armed Forces

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2011
    Messages:
    8,016
    Likes Received:
    330
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Soldier
    Location:
    Eastlake, Ohio
    Well that shot my idea. Lol. A mini arduino. The code base would be supper easy the circuit would be simple. Plus the arduino can run on a 2s lipo just fine.
     
  7. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    Ok...here we go, a review of what this ol dog has learned.looks like I need a srd-05vdc-sl-c relay...correct value uf cap. Next question. To decrease blink rate are uf values increased or decreased? Want strobes to blink 3 times and be off approximate the time of those 3 blinks. Am I going in the correction?
     
  8. murankar

    murankar Moderator Staff Member Armed Forces

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2011
    Messages:
    8,016
    Likes Received:
    330
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Soldier
    Location:
    Eastlake, Ohio
    So if I am thinking this right, the amount of blinks you get is directly related to the capacitor? if so the go with a smaller capacity cap. What size that is I dont know. You may need to view the data sheets of the components to find out what you need. Unless Randy has the knowledge already.
     
  9. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    That is true with cap value...wtih 6Hz strobes that blink rate is fine. My way of thinkin the cap is being used as a timer,the time the circuit is energized or switch closed. Next queston. One would think with 2 strobes in the line the cap value would have to be changed because the cap would discharge faster because it's powering 2 devices opposed to one. Is that correct?
     
  10. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Norman, Ok USA
    With it in astatic mode, the timing is controlled by both the capacitor and resistors. The capacitor will determine how quickly the circuit charges up but it's the resistors that will control how long the circuit is on and off. The timer is the 555 chip itself. When the circuit reaches 2/3'd of the source voltage the circuit goes on... when it drains back down to 1/3'd of the voltage it switches back off.

    The 555 can work with anything from 4.5v up to 16v and can provide up to 7.5mA of power. If your strobe circuit have different needs ( voltage or amperage's ) a relay would be needed. I don't suspect a set of LED's would require more amperage than the output of the 555 can provide.

    Besides the basics given above... I'm not going to be a lot more help. I can follow a set of instructions but I'm not into designing circuits. In short, I can follow a recipe but I wouldn't expect a lot more than that.
     
  11. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    Well...I got some 555's ,resistors an some various uf caps on the way..all the components should be here Friday. I've the caps covered I think..from 1 to 100 uf's in 10 different sizes. Now about the resistors you say they determine how long the circuit is on/off increase ohms to increase time on or what..both resistors , just one. I gonna make this work.
     
  12. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Norman, Ok USA
    You seem to ask questions when I either have a headache... or am up too late at night.... LMAO

    The initial charge of the capacitor is the longest and only happens once. It is charging from zero volts up to 2/3's of the Vcc voltage ( input voltage value ). All consecutive times, the circuit is either charging up to the 2/3's voltage amount... or down to the 1/3'd voltage amount.

    The next charge up is from 1/3 Vcc to the 2/3 Vcc voltage... that time is calculated by the amount of resistance of both resistors ( Ra and Rb ). The time that it takes to discharge down to the 1/3 Vcc voltage, is controlled by the value of just the second resistor Rb . Then everything repeats again and starts the cycle to charge back up from 1/3 Vcc to the 2/3 Vcc amount.
     
  13. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    Well guys here's what I've come up with...played with just the cap to adjust the rate left the resistos the same value...1 10k an 1 100k what ya think settled with a 4.7uf cap at least it's 47 something ...what you think...now to transfer that to some kind of PC board...thats another challenge. Well tried to load video an send ...says file to large..give me some direction an try to send
     
  14. Tony

    Tony Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Messages:
    33,649
    Likes Received:
    1,306
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The only way to post a video to the forum is to upload them to youtube first and then post the link here. We don't have enough server space to allow direct video upload since videos can be in excess of multiple gigabytes.
     
  15. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Norman, Ok USA
    I don't think it matters about a video if you can get it to blink the way you mentioned in the first post... in short, if it blinks 3 times and pauses before it repeats, then you've got it how you described.
     
  16. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    Well thats true ....dont know if its cause I might have learned something...or just luck...you know what they say....even a blind squirrel will find a nut every now an then
     
  17. rdsok

    rdsok Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Norman, Ok USA
    Just because you hadn't learned it yet... doesn't make you blind.
     
  18. grumpy1

    grumpy1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Occupation:
    pipe welder. .pipe fitter. .asme code pipe shop fo
    Location:
    hull,ga
    Man if feel like I'm being a pest asking all these questions. Anyway what kind of board do I need to get . I'm kinda like RDSOK ..Ican follow directions...before I wasn't even in the same boat....at least I'm in the boat now..barely at least you guys can see where the boats going...Im down here in the cargo hold...but in the boat tho...
     

    Attached Files:

  19. Tony

    Tony Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Messages:
    33,649
    Likes Received:
    1,306
    Trophy Points:
    113
    You can do it a couple ways. First, you can get a bread board that has single through holes and you can use solder to bridge those holes to form the traces. The next way is to get a PCB that is solid copper and etch your own traces. Of course you would have to trace out your own traces first, but this is pretty easy with a black sharpie. The other way is to hit up this one company, design your board and have them make it. I'm sure they can make it quite small since we are talking very low current.

    Here is an Instructibles tutorial of how to make your own - DIY Customized Circuit Board (PCB Making)

    Here is the link to the place where you can design your own PCB and they will make it for you very cheap for the first order - PCB Prototype & PCB Fabrication Manufacturer - JLCPCB

    And the single hole pcb's can be had on ebay or any electronic store (sans radioshack even though you can still order from them online lmao)

    Hope this helps.
     

Share This Page