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Power Supply's Dell Poweredge 2850 Mod

bigone5500

Well-Known Member
I need to know how to mod this power supply for use on my charger. @Tony I see you have a video on you tube that shows modding a 600w PSU. Are those the same as the 700w?
 

Smoggie

Well-Known Member
The modifications will be similar but not necessarily identical. I found this pin out photo showing what pins need connecting:
2011-04-16_231015_tjintech-howto-dell57a-04.jpg
 

Tony

Administrator
Staff member
That pinout is correct, but unless you want to hear a 747 on your desk, you will want to add one more pin lmao. The left two pins are the 3.3, otherwise known as PS_KILL and a ground pin (lower left is ground). The far right is what enables 12 volt power which is what the spades are (noted on the picture. You can get 3.3 out of other pins in the array). But, in the picture below, you are going to see two brown wires. You can either bridge those two together, or you can run the left brown wire and connect it to the other wires to slow down that fan. Don't worry about that top left pin with the red wire, that is just another ground pin. I had to use 3 grounds since I was just using jumper wires.

IMG_0817.JPG
 

Tony

Administrator
Staff member
Here is a picture of a plug I made. Works great. In this one the white is ps_kill the red is ps_on and the black one is the fan speed reducer. You can put a switch on the white wire to turn the psu on and off.

image.jpg
 

bigone5500

Well-Known Member
Would it be a good idea to series the two PSUs? Get 24v at 700w. I'm assuming they can be paralleled...
 

Tony

Administrator
Staff member
You will need to float the DC ground on one of them otherwise if one shorts out, it will energize the case of the other one with household voltage. With your setup, you only need one. I think I made a comment that if you wanted to series them to get the HP's in the other thread. I would not do it on these unless you find all of the DC ground connections and isolate them.
 

bigone5500

Well-Known Member
So the PSU I'm getting is 700w. It outputs 12vdc @ 57.3A. This should be more than sufficient for the iCharger 206B. Am I correct? I'm thinking that if it is, then I will have another PSU for other applications.
 

bigone5500

Well-Known Member
After typing that, I had a thought. Will the 12vdc input voltage on the charger limit the amount of cells I can charge?
 

Tony

Administrator
Staff member
No, it has an internal DC to DC converter built into it so you can charge anything up to 6s. And that PSU should be enough for your charger without having to go to 24 volts.
 

bigone5500

Well-Known Member
Got my PSUs today. It seems that the auction was for two different ones. One is 700w and the other is 750w. I guess that makes the deal better.

1516325350585646736294.jpg
 

Tony

Administrator
Staff member
Should be the same pinout that I posted before. Only one way to find out, but I would do a quick google search just to make sure.
 

bigone5500

Well-Known Member
This is about the only thing I found. It's the exact one I have. However, one of the comments stated that you need to connect the negative pins together and the positive pins together to achieve max current from the PSU. Is that true? Here is the video.

 

Tony

Administrator
Staff member
I just use jumpers rather than tearing it all the way apart to jump it like the video is showing. As for connecting all of the pins, I have never heard of doing that and have never done it and trust me, on my HP's, I get all the power I need out of it. I'm sure Dell is the same. Might need to run a stress test just to verify, but don't feel there is really a need.
 

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